Apr 12, 2016

SLELO PRISM Partners Adopt 2016 Work Plan

Unique natural landscapes along the Eastern Lake Ontario Region are host to rare, threatened and endangered species of plants and animals. Many of these aquatic and terrestrial places are being threatened by invasive species. Invasive species are non-native plants and animals that may cause environmental and economic harm and in some cases pose human health threats. To address this, a group of over sixteen partner organizations in a five county region have adopted a plan of work to mitigate the ongoing threat from invasive species. Formally known as the St. Lawrence, Eastern Lake Ontario – Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (SLELO-PRISM), this group is one of eight regional partnerships throughout New York State who’s mission is to protect our lands and waters from the threat of invasive species.

Hosted by The Central and Western New York Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, the SLELO-PRISM is now in their fifth formal year of addressing invasive species threats. The partnership has representatives from various organizations throughout a five county area who have recently developed a robust annual plan of work for the 2016 field season. The plan will address invasive species issues such as spread prevention, early detection, strategic response and ecological restoration which in turn will help to preserve critical lands, waters and natural areas in the region.

According to Rob Williams, Invasive Species Program Coordinator - “Invasive species pose a serious threat to the diversity of our natural areas, our economy and our health – Our partners have adopted a collaborative work plan that will mitigate the impact of invasive species”. Some of the target invasive species that the SLELO partners plan to address include terrestrial plants such as swallow-wort, giant hogweed, and knotweed along with aquatic plants such as water chestnut and hydrilla. Forest pests to include the Emerald Ash Borer and Hemlock Woolly Adelgid are also in focus. Williams goes on to say “some of these species are not yet found in our region, and it is important that we remain proactive”. Last year the partnership was instrumental in protecting dozens of acres of freshwater resources, wetland habitats, forested lands and globally rare alvar lands.

For more information about upcoming PRISM events or for information on invasive species in our area, visit the SLELO website at

Mar 30, 2016

Watercraft Inspection Steward Program Leaders Workshop

Brittney Rogers, NYSG Extension Aide, E:, P: 315.331.8415
Publicist Kara Lynn Dunn, E:, P: 315.465.7578
The second annual Watercraft Inspection Steward Program Leaders workshop will be held on Friday, April 29 as part of the 2016 The Water is Great in New York State Conference in Hamilton, NY. New York Sea Grant and statewide partners are hosting the workshop to help new and existing watercraft inspection program leaders standardize efforts to engage recreational boaters in slowing the spread of aquatic invasive species. 
The workshop will be held on Friday, April 29 from 9:30am to 4:45pm at the White Eagle Banquet and Conference Center in Hamilton, NY. The registration deadline for the workshop is April 20. Conference registration is required with the conference host, the New York State Federation of Lake Associations, at
The Watercraft Inspection Steward Program Leaders Workshop agenda includes presentations on volunteer and paid staff programs start-up, sustainable funding solutions, decontamination techniques and legislation related to watercraft inspection. Sessions will also cover emerging aquatic invasive species already in New York waters, and standardized data collection and use.
Workshop participants will receive a copy of the 81-page, illustrated New York State Watercraft Inspection Steward Program Handbook developed and published by New York Sea Grant in cooperation with the Cornell University Cooperative Extension Invasive Species Program with funding, in part, by the New York State Environmental Protection Fund. The Handbook includes a Watercraft Inspection Steward Training and Field Guide. 
Planning partners for the April 29 workshop include Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper; the Finger Lakes Institute; Lake Champlain Basin Program; New York State Department of Environmental Conservation; New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation; Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program; Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management; Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership; St. Lawrence Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management; Western New York Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management; and Paul Smith’s College.
For more information on the Watercraft Inspection Steward Program Leaders Workshop, contact Brittney Rogers, New York Sea Grant Watercraft Inspection Program Leaders’ Trainer,; 315.331.8415 or NYSDEC Invasive Species Coordination Unit,; 518.402.9405.


Mar 30, 2016

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid - Educational Full Documentary

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. A species few people have heard of – yet it is devastating the Hemlock forests and the delicate ecosystems that depend upon them. From infestations in our own backyards, the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid has already spread throughout the east coast of North America from the Carolinas up into Canada.
The film, “The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid – A Film About the Loss of an Ecosystem” aims to engage and educate the viewer on this all too often, over looked invasive species by explaining its past, present, and what could easily be the future if significant action is not taken.
The Hemlock Wooly Adelgid Documentary is made with the support of the Cayuga Lake Watershed Network, a non-profit focused on environmental conservation. This film is focused on educating and inspiring viewers without cost.
For more information please visit: